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Waec Expo 2024 Literature in English Answer

Here is the correct literature in English Answer

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[5/24, 1:22 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 1 VERSION 1)*

(1)
In the African drama “Let Me Die Alone,” the deaths of Yoko and Gbanya are pivotal moments that encapsulate the themes of power, betrayal, and sacrifice. These events are deeply intertwined with their personal struggles and the political tensions of their time.
Yoko, a historical figure and the drama’s tragic heroine, becomes overwhelmed by the pressures and turmoil in Moyamba. Feeling humiliated and unfit to rule, she decides that the only way to achieve peace is through death. This sense of overwhelming despair drives her to poison herself. In her final speech, Yoko articulates her longing for peace, saying, “If I’m to die, then let me die alone… and now I will know peace. Now I will never be used again. Gbanya, make way, Yoko is coming in search of peace.” Her words reveal her profound disillusionment and her desire to escape the burdens of leadership.
Gbanya, the chief of Senehun and Yoko’s husband, plays a crucial role in the unfolding tragedy through his broken promises and political missteps. Although he initially promises to pass the chiefdom to Yoko, he later retracts, citing the threats from external enemies and the turbulent political environment. This betrayal deepens Yoko’s sense of despair. Gbanya’s failure to keep his promise is evident when he reflects on the changing circumstances: “Remember you made a promise a long time ago that at the time of your death the chiefdom passes into my hands.” His vacillation and eventual poisoning by Lamboi and Musa, who conspire to prevent Yoko from gaining power, precipitate Yoko’s final, tragic decision.
Yoko’s empathetic nature and deep sensitivity to her people’s plight make her a compassionate leader, but these qualities also render her vulnerable to the immense stress and emotional toll of leadership. The constant pressures become unbearable, leading her to conclude that taking her own life is the only way to find peace. Her ultimate act of self-poisoning is a testament to her desire to bear the burdens alone. In her final moments, she declares, “I have savored the fruits of power alone… let me die alone… and now I will know peace,” underscoring her isolation and the weight of her sacrifices.
The political intrigue and external pressures further complicate their lives. Gbanya’s rule is undermined by the British colonial influence, particularly Governor Samuel Rowe, who humiliates him in front of his people. This public degradation symbolizes the erosion of traditional authority and foreshadows the instability that leads to both their deaths. Lamboi and Musa’s conspiracy to poison Gbanya to prevent Yoko from assuming power adds to the tragic unraveling of their lives.
Yoko’s final act of poisoning herself is the culmination of her profound sense of betrayal, loss, and yearning for peace. Her last words, “I… did not bring a child into this world. So let no one mourn my death. Tell the entire Chiefdom, none should mourn my death,” reflect her resignation and desire to be forgotten, highlighting her loneliness and the depth of her sacrifices. This self-imposed isolation in death underscores the tragic dimensions of her character and her quest for peace.
[5/24, 1:24 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 1 VERSION 1)*

(1)
In the African drama “Let Me Die Alone,” the deaths of Yoko and Gbanya are pivotal moments that encapsulate the themes of power, betrayal, and sacrifice. These events are deeply intertwined with their personal struggles and the political tensions of their time.
Yoko, a historical figure and the drama’s tragic heroine, becomes overwhelmed by the pressures and turmoil in Moyamba. Feeling humiliated and unfit to rule, she decides that the only way to achieve peace is through death. This sense of overwhelming despair drives her to poison herself. In her final speech, Yoko articulates her longing for peace, saying, “If I’m to die, then let me die alone… and now I will know peace. Now I will never be used again. Gbanya, make way, Yoko is coming in search of peace.” Her words reveal her profound disillusionment and her desire to escape the burdens of leadership.
Gbanya, the chief of Senehun and Yoko’s husband, plays a crucial role in the unfolding tragedy through his broken promises and political missteps. Although he initially promises to pass the chiefdom to Yoko, he later retracts, citing the threats from external enemies and the turbulent political environment. This betrayal deepens Yoko’s sense of despair. Gbanya’s failure to keep his promise is evident when he reflects on the changing circumstances: “Remember you made a promise a long time ago that at the time of your death the chiefdom passes into my hands.” His vacillation and eventual poisoning by Lamboi and Musa, who conspire to prevent Yoko from gaining power, precipitate Yoko’s final, tragic decision.
Yoko’s empathetic nature and deep sensitivity to her people’s plight make her a compassionate leader, but these qualities also render her vulnerable to the immense stress and emotional toll of leadership. The constant pressures become unbearable, leading her to conclude that taking her own life is the only way to find peace. Her ultimate act of self-poisoning is a testament to her desire to bear the burdens alone. In her final moments, she declares, “I have savored the fruits of power alone… let me die alone… and now I will know peace,” underscoring her isolation and the weight of her sacrifices.
The political intrigue and external pressures further complicate their lives. Gbanya’s rule is undermined by the British colonial influence, particularly Governor Samuel Rowe, who humiliates him in front of his people. This public degradation symbolizes the erosion of traditional authority and foreshadows the instability that leads to both their deaths. Lamboi and Musa’s conspiracy to poison Gbanya to prevent Yoko from assuming power adds to the tragic unraveling of their lives.
Yoko’s final act of poisoning herself is the culmination of her profound sense of betrayal, loss, and yearning for peace. Her last words, “I… did not bring a child into this world. So let no one mourn my death. Tell the entire Chiefdom, none should mourn my death,” reflect her resignation and desire to be forgotten, highlighting her loneliness and the depth of her sacrifices. This self-imposed isolation in death underscores the tragic dimensions of her character and her quest for peace.
[5/24, 1:24 PM] Solution: *2024-WAEC-LITERATURE+DRAMA+POETERY-ANSWERS!!!!*

*SECTION- A(Pls Answer One From each part!!!!!*
(1)
In the play “Let me Die Alone” by John K. KaraBo, the deaths of Gbanya and Yoko are significant events that contribute to the overall plot and themes of the play. In other words Here is the key points of an account of their deaths:

Gbanya’s Death:
-Gbanya’s death can be accounted for as a result of his involvement in a tragic accident, It is revealed that Gbanya, while attempting to escape from a dangerous situation, falls from a high platform and suffers a fatal injury.
-Gbanya, the protagonist, dies at the end of the play due to a combination of physical and emotional exhaustion.
-His death is a result of his inner turmoil, guilt, and the consequences of his actions.
-Gbanya’s refusal to accept responsibility for his mistakes and his stubbornness ultimately lead to his downfall.
-His death serves as a symbol of the destruction of the old order and the need for change and renewal.

Yoko’s Death:
On the other hand
-Yoko’s death can be attributed to her deteriorating health condition. Throughout the play, Yoko’s character is depicted as someone who is battling a terminal illness. Her death, therefore, can be seen as a natural progression of her illness and serves as a poignant reminder of the fragility of life and the inevitability of death.
-Yoko, Gbanya’s wife, dies earlier in the play due to a broken heart and despair.
-Her death is a direct result of Gbanya’s betrayal and abandonment of her and their people.
-Yoko’s death serves as a catalyst for Gbanya’s downfall, as he is haunted by her ghost and the guilt of his actions.
-Her death represents the destruction of innocence and the consequences of Gbanya’s selfish desires.

The deaths of Gbanya and Yoko are tragic and poignant moments in the play, highlighting the consequences of human actions and the need for accountability and redemption.

(3)
WOLE, SOYINKA: The Lion and the Jewel Here are three instances of irony in Wole Soyinka’s play “The Lion and the Jewel” And The Key Points Needed.

(i)Baroka’s Impotence: One ironic element in the play is Baroka’s portrayal as a powerful and virile character, despite his supposed impotence. Throughout the play, Baroka is known for his reputation as a seducer of young women. However, it is revealed that his impotence is a ruse to trick Sidi into believing she can control him. This ironic twist challenges the audience’s initial perception of Baroka’s power and reveals the complexities of his character.

(i)Sidi’s Transformation: Another instance of irony involves Sidi’s transformation from a village beauty into Baroka’s wife. Initially, Sidi is depicted as a strong-willed and independent woman who resists the advances of the men in the village. However, she ultimately succumbs to Baroka’s charm and becomes his wife, which is ironic considering her desire for freedom and modernity.

(iii)The Photographer’s Exploitation: The arrival of the photographer from the city introduces another layer of irony. The photographer claims to be interested in capturing the essence of African beauty and culture, but he ends up exploiting Sidi for his own gain. He objectifies her and uses her image for commercial purposes, contradicting his initial pretense of appreciating and respecting African traditions.

These instances of irony in “The Lion and the Jewel” serve to challenge the audience’s expectations and highlight the complexities of the characters and the themes explored in the play, such as power dynamics, gender roles, and the clash between tradition and modernity.
Completed!!!!
[5/24, 1:24 PM] Solution: *SECTION- C(PLS ANSWER ONE FROM REACH PART*

(9)
In the short story “A Government Service Driver on His Retirement” by Ken Saro-Wiwa, the government driver’s reward upon retirement and death is a complex issue. Here are key points of some arguments for and against:

Arguments for:
-Dedication and loyalty: The driver has served the government faithfully for 35 years, deserving recognition and reward for his dedication and loyalty.
-Hard work and commitment: He has worked tirelessly, often under challenging conditions, and has been committed to his duties.
-Entitlement: After decades of service, he has earned his pension and other retirement benefits as a matter of right.
-Dedication and loyalty
-Hard work and commitment
-Entitlement

Arguments against:
-Corruption and complicity: The driver has been complicit in the corrupt activities of his bosses, profiting from their wrongdoing and turning a blind eye to their abuses of power.
-Moral culpability: By supporting and enabling corrupt officials, he shares some responsibility for their misdeeds and the harm caused to others.
-Unworthy of reward: Given his complicity in corruption, some might argue that he does not deserve a reward or praise for his service.
-Corruption and complicity
-Moral culpability
-Unworthy of reward

Ultimately, whether the government driver deserves a reward is a matter of moral judgment, considering both his dedication and loyalty, as well as his complicity in corruption. The story highlights the complexities of accountability and moral responsibility in a corrupt system.

(10)
The story “The Leader and the Led” by Chinua Achebe, presents a critique of authoritarian leadership and explores the theme of resistance to oppressive leadership styles.
The rejection of the lion’s leadership qualities may symbolize the rejection of autocratic, domineering, or self-serving leadership traits. It could also reflect the desire for more inclusive, fair, and participatory forms of leadership within the animal community. Here are the key points they include:
-Autocracy: The lion’s dictatorial and oppressive rule, making decisions without consulting others.
-Selfishness: The lion’s prioritization of his own interests and needs over the well-being of the other animals.
-Injustice: The lion’s unfair treatment of others, using his power to exploit and oppress.
-Arrogance: The lion’s pride and arrogance, believing himself to be superior to others.
-Lack of empathy: The lion’s failure to understand and consider the perspectives and needs of the other animals.

The animals reject these qualities, seeking a more inclusive, fair, and compassionate leadership that values the well-being of all.

Completed!!!!
[5/24, 1:24 PM] Solution: *SECTION- B(Pls Answer One From each part!!!!!*

(5)
In John Osborne’s play “Look Back in Anger”, sarcasm is a vital tool used to convey the characters’ emotions, frustrations, and social commentary. Here are some comments on the use of sarcasm in the play:
-Jimmy Porter’s sarcasm: Jimmy, the protagonist, frequently employs sarcasm to express his disillusionment with society, his wife Alison, and his friend Cliff. His biting remarks and ironic comments reveal his anger and frustration.
-Deflection and self-protection: Characters use sarcasm to deflect genuine emotions and vulnerabilities, shielding themselves from hurt and intimacy.
-Social commentary: Osborne utilizes sarcasm to critique post-war British society, targeting issues like class, gender roles, and cultural stagnation.
-Relationship dynamics: Sarcasm is used to expose the cracks in relationships, particularly between Jimmy and Alison, highlighting the tension and discontent beneath their surface interactions.
-Character insight: Sarcasm provides a window into the characters’ thoughts and feelings, often revealing their true intentions and emotions beneath their façades.

The strategic use of sarcasm in “Look Back in Anger” adds depth, complexity, and nuance to the characters and their interactions, underscoring the play’s themes of disillusionment, rebellion, and social critique. Emphasizing the underlying tension and conflict within the play.

(7)
Friday is an important day in the play “Fences” by August Wilson,
Friday is a crucial element in the play “Fences” by August Wilson. It serves as a symbolic day when Troy and Bono, his friend and co-worker, come together to engage in their weekly tradition of drinking and sharing stories. Friday acts as a catalyst for deeper character exploration and serves as a significant backdrop for the development of the play’s themes and conflicts.

Here Are Few Of My Key points
-This recurring ritual not only strengthens their bond but also provides a space for them to reflect on their lives, share their dreams and disappointments, and navigate the complexities of their relationships.
-The play begins on a Friday, setting the tone for the rest of the story.
-Troy and Bono’s weekly ritual of drinking and talking takes place on Fridays.
-The play’s climax, where Troy reveals his affair to Rose, also occurs on a Friday.
-Fridays serve as a reminder of Troy’s struggles and the cyclical nature of his life.

Overall, Fridays in the play symbolize the repetition and stagnation in Troy’s life, as well as the consequences of his actions.

Completed!!!!

[5/24, 1:26 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 3 VERSION 1)*

(3)
The playwright makes use of some dramatic irony. Dramatic irony refers to the audience’s knowledge of something that the character who is speaking does not know. When the character makes an innocent remark action that refers to the “inside knowledge” that the audience has the character does not have, contains dramatic irony. For example, dramatic irony is seen when Sidi goes to the Bale’s palace to mock and taunt his impotence.
The audience is very much aware that Baroka’s much-publicized impotence is just a ploy to have Sidi to himself and woo her for marriage. It is also ironic that Sadiku, the head wife has also dragged into the trick and manipulation also. When Sidi makes up her mind to honor Baroka’s visit which she earlier turns down, the audience and the Bale himself are pretty aware that she will become the object of Baroka’s expensive joke when he eventually wins.
Another instance of dramatic irony is evident in the scene when Lakunle expects Sidi to be back from Bale’s palace. He is very much tensed and anxious to have her back. The audience is aware that Sidi has fallen victim to Baroka’s fake impotence. Also, the women are busy making sarcastic and sneering comments about the Bale’s supposed impotence while Baroka is busy exercising his manliness on Sidi in the palace.
There is also an instance of situational irony in the play. Situation irony is a situation in which actions that are opposite occurring that are not intended and the outcome is contrary to what is expected. For instance, it is ironic that the old Baroka, a man who does not want the railway to be built through llunjunle and consequently bribes the surveyor to stop the project, decides he must embrace modernity by having a stamp machine that would print Sidi’s images, given that his images are poorly treated as they are placed next to the latrine in the magazines.
[5/24, 1:26 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 1 VERSION 2)*

(1)
The deaths of Yoko and Gbanya serve as turning points in the African drama “Let Me Die Alone,” capturing the themes of sacrifice, betrayal, and power. The political unrest of their era and their personal hardships are intricately linked to these occurrences.
The tragic heroine of the play and a historical character, Yoko, is overtaken by the stress and unrest in Moyamba. She believes that death is the only way to bring about peace because she feels degraded and unable to be in charge. She poisons herself because of this overwhelming sense of hopelessness. Yoko expresses her desire for peace in her last speech by stating,“If I’m to die, then let me die alone… and now I will know peace. Now I will never be used again. Gbanya, make way, Yoko is coming in search of peace.” Her statements express her deep disappointment and wish to be freed from the responsibilities of leadership.
Through his unfulfilled promises and political gaffes, Gbanya, the chief of Senehun and Yoko’s husband, plays a pivotal role in the tragedy that is developing. Despite his original pledge to give Yoko the chiefdom, he later backtracks, citing the unstable political climate and threats from outside foes. Yoko becomes more depressed as a result of this betrayal. When Gbanya considers the evolving situation, it is clear that he has broken his word: “Remember you made a promise a long time ago that at the time of your death the chiefdom passes into my hands.” Yoko’s last, fatal decision is sparked by his indecisiveness and the eventual poisoning by Lamboi and Musa, who plot to keep Yoko from becoming powerful.
Yoko is a caring leader because of her empathy and acute awareness of the suffering of her people, but these traits also leave her susceptible to the extreme stress and emotional toll that come with being in a position of authority. She comes to the conclusion that the only way to achieve peace is to end her own life since the incessant pressures grow intolerable. Her final act of self-poisoning demonstrates her determination to carry the weight by herself. In her final moments, she declares, “I have savored the fruits of power alone… let me die alone… and now I will know peace,” underscoring her isolation and the weight of her sacrifices.
Their lives are made more difficult by outside influences and political intrigue. The British colonial influence weakens Gbanya’s rule, especially through Governor Samuel Rowe’s humiliation of him in front of his people. This public humiliation foreshadows the instability that ultimately results in their murders and represents the deterioration of established authority. The terrible disintegration of Lamboi and Musa’s life is exacerbated by their plot to poison Gbanya in order to keep Yoko from seizing control.
The pinnacle of Yoko’s intense feelings of loss, betrayal, and desire for peace was her ultimate act of poisoning herself. Her last words, “I… did not bring a child into this world. So let no one mourn my death. Tell the entire Chiefdom, none should mourn my death,” which emphasize her loneliness and the extent of her sacrifices. Her self-imposed seclusion in death highlights the tragic aspects of her personality and her search for tranquility.

[5/24, 1:26 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 3 VERSION 1)*

(3)
The playwright makes use of some dramatic irony. Dramatic irony refers to the audience’s knowledge of something that the character who is speaking does not know. When the character makes an innocent remark action that refers to the “inside knowledge” that the audience has the character does not have, contains dramatic irony. For example, dramatic irony is seen when Sidi goes to the Bale’s palace to mock and taunt his impotence.
The audience is very much aware that Baroka’s much-publicized impotence is just a ploy to have Sidi to himself and woo her for marriage. It is also ironic that Sadiku, the head wife has also dragged into the trick and manipulation also. When Sidi makes up her mind to honor Baroka’s visit which she earlier turns down, the audience and the Bale himself are pretty aware that she will become the object of Baroka’s expensive joke when he eventually wins.
Another instance of dramatic irony is evident in the scene when Lakunle expects Sidi to be back from Bale’s palace. He is very much tensed and anxious to have her back. The audience is aware that Sidi has fallen victim to Baroka’s fake impotence. Also, the women are busy making sarcastic and sneering comments about the Bale’s supposed impotence while Baroka is busy exercising his manliness on Sidi in the palace.
There is also an instance of situational irony in the play. Situation irony is a situation in which actions that are opposite occurring that are not intended and the outcome is contrary to what is expected. For instance, it is ironic that the old Baroka, a man who does not want the railway to be built through llunjunle and consequently bribes the surveyor to stop the project, decides he must embrace modernity by having a stamp machine that would print Sidi’s images, given that his images are poorly treated as they are placed next to the latrine in the magazines.
[5/24, 1:32 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 5 VERSION 2)*

(5)
The play is full with the sharp resonances of sarcasm, which may be used in a variety of ways to analyze the inner conflicts, interpersonal relationships, and social criticisms of the characters. Osborne’s deft use of irony makes the play a moving examination of post-war disillusionment, class conflict, and the intricacies of interpersonal relationships.
Jimmy Porter, the play’s main character, is a master of cutting wit and stinging sarcasm who uses them as both armor and a weapon in his constant fight against what he perceives to be societal injustices. Jimmy is full of caustic jabs, aimed not only at larger society structures but also at his closest confidants, Cliff and Alison. His harsh comments directed at his wife Alison and his buddy Cliff, who is a member of the working class, show a deep-seated annoyance with their perceived shortcomings and the limitations imposed by their different social classes. Jimmy expresses his dissatisfaction with the current situation through sarcasm, utilizing comedy as a front for his underlying hurt and insecurity.
Alison and Cliff, on the other hand, use sarcasm to establish their agency and defend themselves in their turbulent interactions with Jimmy. After being presented as timid and obedient at first, Alison eventually learns to use sarcasm as a tactic to question Jimmy’s authority and claim her own independence. Her sardonic responses demonstrate her growing disenchantment with their marriage and with society in general, acting as a subliminal protest against Jimmy’s controlling actions.
In addition, the play uses sarcasm as a kind of conflict resolution, letting individuals work through their complicated relationships without coming to blows with one another. Characters use caustic exchanges to air concerns and make their viewpoints known, rather than having open conversations. This deceptive method of resolving disputes highlights the individuals’ underlying fears and the brittleness of their relationships with one another.
Sarcasm is a powerful tool for social commentary that extends beyond personal relationships. It may be used to provide biting criticism of the class divide and social mores that characterized post-war England. Osborne examines the discrepancy between society aspirations and life reality by exposing the absurdity and hypocrisy present in the strict social order through sardonic discourse. The characters’ unhappiness with the ossified institutions of privilege and class is expressed via sarcasm, which satisfies their need for change and disruption.
In the end, the characters use sarcasm as a coping strategy to help them work through the difficulties in their life when things are chaotic and unclear. Characters regain some agency and empowerment through sardonic conversation, giving them a feeling of control in an otherwise hopeless and disillusioned environment.
[5/24, 1:33 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 6 VERSION 1)*

(6)
Cliff’s treatment of Alison stands in stark contrast to that of Jimmy. As a gentle and empathetic individual, Cliff represents a more compassionate and understanding presence in Alison’s life, providing her with emotional support and protection against Jimmy’s abrasive behavior.
Firstly, Cliff’s gentle demeanor and genuine fondness for Alison highlight his role as a comforting figure. Unlike Jimmy, who often exhibits fire, wit, and a bullying attitude, Cliff lacks any form of cruelty or verbal abuse. He appreciates Alison’s efforts in housekeeping and openly expresses his gratitude, creating a stark contrast to Jimmy’s harshness. This appreciation is evident in the way Cliff personally bandages Alison’s arm after she gets burnt, showcasing his caring nature and attentiveness to her well-being.
Cliff’s empathy and sensitivity further distinguish his character. He does not merely share in the problems of others but also seems to have an innate understanding of their feelings. Acting as a mediator between Jimmy and Alison, Cliff sacrifices his time and energy to try and maintain harmony in their tumultuous relationship. When Helena expresses her disdain for Jimmy, Cliff perceptively suggests that she might actually harbor deeper feelings for him. He is also the only person who senses Alison’s growing inclination to end her marriage, highlighting his intuitive understanding of her emotional state.
Moreover, Cliff’s relaxed and easy-going nature, combined with his self-taught intelligence, makes him a stabilizing force in the play. His affectionate relationship with Alison, while it has elements of sexual tension, remains rooted in a comfortable fondness rather than passionate desire. This platonic yet intimate bond provides Alison with a safe space amidst the chaos of her marriage. However, recognizing the need to pursue his own life, Cliff eventually decides to leave Jimmy’s apartment, demonstrating his desire for personal growth and independence.
Cliff’s good nature and supportive role make him a confidant for Alison. He is ever willing to offer his assistance and counsel, encouraging her to reconsider her decision to leave Jimmy. When Alison expresses her disillusionment with love, Cliff gently admonishes her, urging her not to give up on her relationship. His steadfast support underscores his commitment to Alison’s happiness and his belief in the possibility of reconciliation.
[5/24, 1:33 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 5 VERSION 2)*

(5)
The play is full with the sharp resonances of sarcasm, which may be used in a variety of ways to analyze the inner conflicts, interpersonal relationships, and social criticisms of the characters. Osborne’s deft use of irony makes the play a moving examination of post-war disillusionment, class conflict, and the intricacies of interpersonal relationships.
Jimmy Porter, the play’s main character, is a master of cutting wit and stinging sarcasm who uses them as both armor and a weapon in his constant fight against what he perceives to be societal injustices. Jimmy is full of caustic jabs, aimed not only at larger society structures but also at his closest confidants, Cliff and Alison. His harsh comments directed at his wife Alison and his buddy Cliff, who is a member of the working class, show a deep-seated annoyance with their perceived shortcomings and the limitations imposed by their different social classes. Jimmy expresses his dissatisfaction with the current situation through sarcasm, utilizing comedy as a front for his underlying hurt and insecurity.
Alison and Cliff, on the other hand, use sarcasm to establish their agency and defend themselves in their turbulent interactions with Jimmy. After being presented as timid and obedient at first, Alison eventually learns to use sarcasm as a tactic to question Jimmy’s authority and claim her own independence. Her sardonic responses demonstrate her growing disenchantment with their marriage and with society in general, acting as a subliminal protest against Jimmy’s controlling actions.
In addition, the play uses sarcasm as a kind of conflict resolution, letting individuals work through their complicated relationships without coming to blows with one another. Characters use caustic exchanges to air concerns and make their viewpoints known, rather than having open conversations. This deceptive method of resolving disputes highlights the individuals’ underlying fears and the brittleness of their relationships with one another.
Sarcasm is a powerful tool for social commentary that extends beyond personal relationships. It may be used to provide biting criticism of the class divide and social mores that characterized post-war England. Osborne examines the discrepancy between society aspirations and life reality by exposing the absurdity and hypocrisy present in the strict social order through sardonic discourse. The characters’ unhappiness with the ossified institutions of privilege and class is expressed via sarcasm, which satisfies their need for change and disruption.
In the end, the characters use sarcasm as a coping strategy to help them work through the difficulties in their life when things are chaotic and unclear. Characters regain some agency and empowerment through sardonic conversation, giving them a feeling of control in an otherwise hopeless and disillusioned environment.
[5/24, 1:33 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 6 VERSION 2)*

(6)
Cliff’s handling of Alison is very different from Jimmy’s. Cliff is a kind and sympathetic person who offers Alison emotional support and shields her from Jimmy’s harsh actions. He is a more understanding and caring presence in Alison’s life.
First of all, Cliff plays a soothing figure because of his kind nature and sincere affection for Alison. In contrast to Jimmy, who frequently demonstrates wit, fire, and a bullying demeanor, Cliff does not engage in verbal or physical violence. He is far more appreciative of Alison’s cleaning efforts and publicly shows his appreciation than Jimmy is. Cliff shows how much he cares about Alison by physically bandaging her arm after she is burned, demonstrating how concerned he is for her welfare.
Cliff’s sensitive nature and capacity for empathy set him apart even further. Not only does he participate in other people’s difficulties, but he also seems to have a natural empathy for other people. Cliff gives up his time and effort to serve as a mediator between Jimmy and Alison in an attempt to keep things peaceful in their turbulent relationship. Cliff slyly implies that Helena may perhaps have stronger feelings for Jimmy when she shows her contempt for him. In addition, he is the only one who notices Alison’s increasing desire to dissolve her marriage, demonstrating his keen awareness of her emotional condition.
In addition, Cliff provides stability to the play with his easygoing demeanor and intellect that he self-taught. Though there is some sexual tension in their relationship, his devotion for Alison is based more on a cozy warmth than on intense need. of the midst of the turmoil of her marriage, Alison finds comfort in this close but platonic relationship. But Cliff finally makes the decision to leave Jimmy’s flat, indicating his desire for independence and personal development as he realizes he needs to live his own life.
Cliff is a confidant to Alison because of his kindness and helpful demeanor. He is always ready to lend his support and advice, urging her to think again before deciding to part ways with Jimmy. Cliff gently chastises Alison for her disillusionment with love and exhorts her to stick with her relationship. His unwavering support demonstrates his dedication to Alison’s happiness and his faith in their potential for reunification.
[5/24, 1:33 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 7 VERSION 2)*

(7)
Friday is a pivotal day that highlights a number of important facets of the lives and relationships of the characters, signifying both everyday events and big moments. The play’s repeated mention of Friday highlights how cyclical their conflicts, goals, and problems are. Wilson creates a complicated narrative that emphasizes the significance of Fridays in forming the experiences of the characters and the overarching plot through a variety of Friday-related occurrences.
On a Friday in 1957, when the play starts, Troy and Bono—two close friends and garbage collectors—are getting paid. This day represents a little reprieve from their arduous work, enabling them to partake in their custom of drinking and conversing. Troy and Bono’s relationship is strengthened by the payday ritual, which also provides insight into their common challenges as working-class African American males. Troy confronts their manager, Mr. Rand, about racial prejudice at work, and their interaction demonstrates Troy’s bravery and tenacity. Friday is a day for introspection and resistance since Troy’s fight against systematic racism is reflected in his desire for equitable work chances.
Troy and his family’s conflict is exacerbated by Friday as well. Today, Cory, Troy’s son, talks about wanting to play college football, something Troy strongly disagrees with. Troy’s own encounters with racial prejudice in athletics are the reason behind his inability to endorse Cory’s goals. His doubts about Cory’s football career highlight the generational divide and divergent views on success and opportunity. When Troy tells Cory’s coach that he can no longer play, thereby dashing his son’s ambitions, the tension is increased even further. In this sense, Friday is significant because it represents a day when familial and personal tensions escalate, compelling people to face their wants and anxieties.
The Friday events also bring Troy’s nuanced connections with other characters to light. For example, the tense connection between father and son is shown when Lyons, Troy’s oldest son from a previous marriage, comes to borrow money. The fact that Lyons asks Troy for money on payday not only shows how dependent he is on him, but it also highlights Troy’s mixed feelings as a parent who both supports and resents his son’s desire to pursue music. Furthermore, Troy’s relationship with his wife Rose is made more difficult by Bono’s charge of his adultery, which was prompted by Troy purchasing a drink for a different lady. These Friday conversations reveal the underlying tensions that underlie their lives and the brittleness of familial connections.
The play goes on to show how important Fridays are. Troy celebrates becoming the first black garbage truck driver in the city in Act One, Scene Four, which also takes place on a Friday. Even though this accomplishment is noteworthy, there is still continuous family strife, so it is bittersweet. When Cory confronts Troy, it foreshadows deeper issues as his resentment for ruining his football ambitions reappears. This day highlights the dichotomy of accomplishment and agony as Troy considers his background, his hardships, and his duties as a husband and parent.
Troy’s life begins to fall apart in the second act, with major incidents that likewise center around Fridays. Troy’s relationships become more difficult as a result of his romance with Alberta and her eventual pregnancy. Troy is forced to deal with the fallout from his actions when Alberta passes away during delivery. A turning point in Rose and Troy’s marriage was her decision to raise Raynell while emotionally separating herself from him. The fact that these occurrences culminate on Fridays highlights the significance of the day as a representation of both disruption and regularity, which reflects Troy’s life’s ups and downs.
[5/24, 1:33 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 7 VERSION 1)*

(7)
Friday serves as a significant day that brings to light various crucial aspects of the characters’ lives and their interactions, symbolizing both routine and turning points. The recurrence of Friday in the play underscores the cyclic nature of their struggles, aspirations, and confrontations. Through different events that transpire on Fridays, Wilson weaves a complex narrative that highlights the importance of this day in shaping the characters’ experiences and the overall story arc.
The play opens on a Friday in 1957, marking payday for Troy and Bono, two garbage collectors and close friends. This day symbolizes a moment of temporary relief from their labor-intensive work, allowing them to engage in their ritual of drinking and talking. The payday ritual not only cements the bond between Troy and Bono but also offers a glimpse into their shared struggles as working-class African American men. Their conversation reveals Troy’s courage and determination as he questions their boss, Mr. Rand, about the racial discrimination in their workplace. Troy’s desire for equal job opportunities reflects his broader struggle against systemic racism, making Friday a day of reflection and resistance.
Friday also serves as a catalyst for tension between Troy and his family. On this day, Troy’s son Cory discusses his aspirations to play college football, which Troy vehemently opposes. Troy’s refusal to support Cory’s dreams is rooted in his own experiences of racial discrimination in sports. His skepticism about Cory’s future in football exposes the generational conflict and differing perspectives on opportunity and success. This tension is further amplified when Troy informs Cory’s coach that Cory can no longer play, effectively shattering his son’s hopes. The significance of Friday in this context lies in its role as a day when personal and familial conflicts come to a head, forcing characters to confront their fears and desires.
The events of Friday also highlight Troy’s complex relationships with other characters. For instance, when Lyons, Troy’s eldest son from a previous marriage, visits to borrow money, it underscores the strained relationship between father and son. Lyons’ request for financial assistance on payday reveals his dependence on Troy, while also illustrating Troy’s conflicting emotions as a provider who resents yet supports his son’s musical aspirations. Moreover, Bono’s accusation of Troy’s infidelity, sparked by Troy buying a drink for another woman, further complicates his relationship with Rose, his wife. These interactions on Fridays expose the fragility of familial bonds and the underlying tensions that permeate their lives.
As the play progresses, Fridays continue to be pivotal. In Act One, Scene Four, which also occurs on a Friday, Troy celebrates his victory in becoming the first black garbage truck driver in the city. This achievement, while significant, is bittersweet as it comes amid ongoing familial discord. Cory’s anger towards Troy for sabotaging his football dreams resurfaces, leading to a confrontation that foreshadows deeper conflicts. Troy’s reflection.

[5/24, 1:50 PM] Solution: *WAEC LITERATURE INSTRUCTORS*
*===================*
*===================*
“` ANSWER ONE QUESTION FROM EACH SECTION “`
*===================*
*===================*

*SECTION A*
NUMBER 1
NUMBER 2
NUMBER 3
NUMBER 3
*================*
*================*
*SECTION B*
NUMBER 5
NUMBER 6
NUMBER 7
NUMBER 8
*================*
*================*
*SECTION C*
NUMBER, 9
NUMBER 10
*================*
*================*
*SECTION D*
NUMBER 11
NUMBER 12
*================*
*================*

*COMPLETED*✅✅
[5/24, 1:52 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 4 VERSION 1)*

(4)
In Wole Soyinka’s “The Lion and the Jewel,” Lakunle’s attitude towards Baroka is complex and multifaceted, reflecting his deep-seated animosity and ideological differences with the older man. Lakunle’s disdain for Baroka, the Bale of Ilujinle, is fueled by several factors, each contributing to his passionate hatred and rivalry.

Firstly, Baroka’s interest in Sidi, which is sparked by her sudden fame, intensifies Lakunle’s loathing. When Sadiku, Baroka’s eldest wife, is sent to convey the Bale’s message of love to Sidi, she is met with rejection by the conceited girl. Baroka’s pursuit of Sidi becomes a significant point of contention for Lakunle, who already harbors deep resentment towards the Bale. Lakunle perceives Baroka’s intentions as yet another manifestation of his oppressive and archaic ways, further fueling his hatred.
Additionally, Lakunle blames Baroka for hindering progress in Ilujinle. He accuses the Bale of deliberately blocking the railway that would have passed through the village, believing that Baroka fears the changes and attractions that such development would bring. This act, in Lakunle’s view, epitomizes Baroka’s resistance to modernization and progress, which Lakunle fervently advocates. For Lakunle, Baroka symbolizes the stagnation and backwardness that he despises, intensifying his animosity towards the old man.
Despite Lakunle’s intense displeasure, Baroka remains undeterred in his pursuit of Sidi. In fact, Lakunle’s hatred seems to spur Baroka’s desire even further, possibly as a means to antagonize his rival. Baroka’s determination to win Sidi’s affection leads him to employ cunning tactics. He concocts a ruse of sudden impotence, using Sadiku to spread the false news to Sidi. This deception is part of Baroka’s strategy to manipulate Sidi into letting her guard down, thus enabling him to seduce her.
Sadiku plays a crucial role in Baroka’s scheme. She unwittingly becomes the bearer of the Bale’s deceit, naively believing the fabricated story of Baroka’s impotence. In her mischievous excitement, Sadiku taunts Baroka, thinking she has bested the powerful Bale. However, this belief in a lie ultimately leads Sidi into Baroka’s embrace, resulting in her marriage to him and the rejection of Lakunle.
Lakunle’s reaction to Sidi’s marriage to Baroka encapsulates his ultimate defeat and the futility of his efforts. Despite his vehement opposition to Baroka and his attempts to thwart the Bale’s plans, Lakunle is unable to prevent Sidi from succumbing to Baroka’s charm and cunning. This outcome not only solidifies Baroka’s dominance but also highlights the stark contrast between Lakunle’s idealistic but ineffective approach and Baroka’s pragmatic and manipulative strategies.
[5/24, 1:52 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 5 VERSION 1)*

(5)
The play reverberates with the caustic echoes of sarcasm, serving as a multifaceted tool to dissect characters’ inner turmoil, interpersonal dynamics, and societal critiques. Through Osborne’s adept utilization of sarcasm, the play emerges as a poignant exploration of post-war disillusionment, class struggle, and the complexities of human relationships.
At the heart of the play lies the protagonist, Jimmy Porter, whose razor-sharp wit and biting sarcasm serve as both armor and weapon in his relentless battle against the perceived injustices of society. Jimmy’s sarcastic barbs are directed indiscriminately, targeting his closest confidants, Cliff and Alison, as well as broader societal constructs. His scathing remarks towards Cliff, a working-class friend, and Alison, his own wife, reveal a deep-seated frustration with their perceived inadequacies and the constraints of their respective social positions. Through sarcasm, Jimmy articulates his disillusionment with the status quo, using humor as a shield to mask his underlying pain and insecurity.
In turn, Alison and Cliff employ sarcasm as a means of self-defense and assertion of agency within their tumultuous relationships with Jimmy. Alison, initially portrayed as meek and submissive, gradually adopts sarcasm as a tool to challenge Jimmy’s dominance and assert her own autonomy. Her sarcastic retorts serve as a subtle rebellion against Jimmy’s oppressive behavior, signaling her growing disillusionment with their marriage and societal expectations.
Moreover, sarcasm emerges as a form of conflict resolution within the play, allowing characters to navigate their complex relationships while avoiding direct confrontation. Instead of engaging in open dialogue, characters resort to sarcastic exchanges as a means of expressing grievances and asserting their positions. This indirect approach to conflict resolution underscores the characters’ underlying insecurities and the fragility of their interpersonal connections.
Beyond the realm of individual relationships, sarcasm serves as a potent vehicle for social commentary, offering scathing critiques of post-war England’s societal norms and class distinctions. Through sarcastic dialogue, Osborne exposes the hypocrisy and absurdity inherent in the rigid social hierarchy, interrogating the disparity between societal ideals and lived realities. Sarcasm becomes a means of articulating the characters’ frustration with the ossified structures of class and privilege, fueling their desire for change and upheaval.
Ultimately, sarcasm functions as a coping mechanism for the characters, enabling them to navigate the complexities of their lives amidst turmoil and uncertainty. Through sarcastic banter, characters carve out moments of agency and empowerment, reclaiming a semblance of control in a world fraught with disillusionment and despair.
[5/24, 1:52 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 5 VERSION 2)*

(5)
The play is full with the sharp resonances of sarcasm, which may be used in a variety of ways to analyze the inner conflicts, interpersonal relationships, and social criticisms of the characters. Osborne’s deft use of irony makes the play a moving examination of post-war disillusionment, class conflict, and the intricacies of interpersonal relationships.
Jimmy Porter, the play’s main character, is a master of cutting wit and stinging sarcasm who uses them as both armor and a weapon in his constant fight against what he perceives to be societal injustices. Jimmy is full of caustic jabs, aimed not only at larger society structures but also at his closest confidants, Cliff and Alison. His harsh comments directed at his wife Alison and his buddy Cliff, who is a member of the working class, show a deep-seated annoyance with their perceived shortcomings and the limitations imposed by their different social classes. Jimmy expresses his dissatisfaction with the current situation through sarcasm, utilizing comedy as a front for his underlying hurt and insecurity.
Alison and Cliff, on the other hand, use sarcasm to establish their agency and defend themselves in their turbulent interactions with Jimmy. After being presented as timid and obedient at first, Alison eventually learns to use sarcasm as a tactic to question Jimmy’s authority and claim her own independence. Her sardonic responses demonstrate her growing disenchantment with their marriage and with society in general, acting as a subliminal protest against Jimmy’s controlling actions.
In addition, the play uses sarcasm as a kind of conflict resolution, letting individuals work through their complicated relationships without coming to blows with one another. Characters use caustic exchanges to air concerns and make their viewpoints known, rather than having open conversations. This deceptive method of resolving disputes highlights the individuals’ underlying fears and the brittleness of their relationships with one another.
Sarcasm is a powerful tool for social commentary that extends beyond personal relationships. It may be used to provide biting criticism of the class divide and social mores that characterized post-war England. Osborne examines the discrepancy between society aspirations and life reality by exposing the absurdity and hypocrisy present in the strict social order through sardonic discourse. The characters’ unhappiness with the ossified institutions of privilege and class is expressed via sarcasm, which satisfies their need for change and disruption.
In the end, the characters use sarcasm as a coping strategy to help them work through the difficulties in their life when things are chaotic and unclear. Characters regain some agency and empowerment through sardonic conversation, giving them a feeling of control in an otherwise hopeless and disillusioned environment.
[5/24, 1:52 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 6 VERSION 1)*

(6)
Cliff’s treatment of Alison stands in stark contrast to that of Jimmy. As a gentle and empathetic individual, Cliff represents a more compassionate and understanding presence in Alison’s life, providing her with emotional support and protection against Jimmy’s abrasive behavior.
Firstly, Cliff’s gentle demeanor and genuine fondness for Alison highlight his role as a comforting figure. Unlike Jimmy, who often exhibits fire, wit, and a bullying attitude, Cliff lacks any form of cruelty or verbal abuse. He appreciates Alison’s efforts in housekeeping and openly expresses his gratitude, creating a stark contrast to Jimmy’s harshness. This appreciation is evident in the way Cliff personally bandages Alison’s arm after she gets burnt, showcasing his caring nature and attentiveness to her well-being.
Cliff’s empathy and sensitivity further distinguish his character. He does not merely share in the problems of others but also seems to have an innate understanding of their feelings. Acting as a mediator between Jimmy and Alison, Cliff sacrifices his time and energy to try and maintain harmony in their tumultuous relationship. When Helena expresses her disdain for Jimmy, Cliff perceptively suggests that she might actually harbor deeper feelings for him. He is also the only person who senses Alison’s growing inclination to end her marriage, highlighting his intuitive understanding of her emotional state.
Moreover, Cliff’s relaxed and easy-going nature, combined with his self-taught intelligence, makes him a stabilizing force in the play. His affectionate relationship with Alison, while it has elements of sexual tension, remains rooted in a comfortable fondness rather than passionate desire. This platonic yet intimate bond provides Alison with a safe space amidst the chaos of her marriage. However, recognizing the need to pursue his own life, Cliff eventually decides to leave Jimmy’s apartment, demonstrating his desire for personal growth and independence.
Cliff’s good nature and supportive role make him a confidant for Alison. He is ever willing to offer his assistance and counsel, encouraging her to reconsider her decision to leave Jimmy. When Alison expresses her disillusionment with love, Cliff gently admonishes her, urging her not to give up on her relationship. His steadfast support underscores his commitment to Alison’s happiness and his belief in the possibility of reconciliation.
[5/24, 1:52 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 6 VERSION 2)*

(6)
Cliff’s handling of Alison is very different from Jimmy’s. Cliff is a kind and sympathetic person who offers Alison emotional support and shields her from Jimmy’s harsh actions. He is a more understanding and caring presence in Alison’s life.
First of all, Cliff plays a soothing figure because of his kind nature and sincere affection for Alison. In contrast to Jimmy, who frequently demonstrates wit, fire, and a bullying demeanor, Cliff does not engage in verbal or physical violence. He is far more appreciative of Alison’s cleaning efforts and publicly shows his appreciation than Jimmy is. Cliff shows how much he cares about Alison by physically bandaging her arm after she is burned, demonstrating how concerned he is for her welfare.
Cliff’s sensitive nature and capacity for empathy set him apart even further. Not only does he participate in other people’s difficulties, but he also seems to have a natural empathy for other people. Cliff gives up his time and effort to serve as a mediator between Jimmy and Alison in an attempt to keep things peaceful in their turbulent relationship. Cliff slyly implies that Helena may perhaps have stronger feelings for Jimmy when she shows her contempt for him. In addition, he is the only one who notices Alison’s increasing desire to dissolve her marriage, demonstrating his keen awareness of her emotional condition.
In addition, Cliff provides stability to the play with his easygoing demeanor and intellect that he self-taught. Though there is some sexual tension in their relationship, his devotion for Alison is based more on a cozy warmth than on intense need. of the midst of the turmoil of her marriage, Alison finds comfort in this close but platonic relationship. But Cliff finally makes the decision to leave Jimmy’s flat, indicating his desire for independence and personal development as he realizes he needs to live his own life.
Cliff is a confidant to Alison because of his kindness and helpful demeanor. He is always ready to lend his support and advice, urging her to think again before deciding to part ways with Jimmy. Cliff gently chastises Alison for her disillusionment with love and exhorts her to stick with her relationship. His unwavering support demonstrates his dedication to Alison’s happiness and his faith in their potential for reunification.
[5/24, 1:52 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 7 VERSION 1)*

(7)
Friday serves as a significant day that brings to light various crucial aspects of the characters’ lives and their interactions, symbolizing both routine and turning points. The recurrence of Friday in the play underscores the cyclic nature of their struggles, aspirations, and confrontations. Through different events that transpire on Fridays, Wilson weaves a complex narrative that highlights the importance of this day in shaping the characters’ experiences and the overall story arc.
The play opens on a Friday in 1957, marking payday for Troy and Bono, two garbage collectors and close friends. This day symbolizes a moment of temporary relief from their labor-intensive work, allowing them to engage in their ritual of drinking and talking. The payday ritual not only cements the bond between Troy and Bono but also offers a glimpse into their shared struggles as working-class African American men. Their conversation reveals Troy’s courage and determination as he questions their boss, Mr. Rand, about the racial discrimination in their workplace. Troy’s desire for equal job opportunities reflects his broader struggle against systemic racism, making Friday a day of reflection and resistance.
Friday also serves as a catalyst for tension between Troy and his family. On this day, Troy’s son Cory discusses his aspirations to play college football, which Troy vehemently opposes. Troy’s refusal to support Cory’s dreams is rooted in his own experiences of racial discrimination in sports. His skepticism about Cory’s future in football exposes the generational conflict and differing perspectives on opportunity and success. This tension is further amplified when Troy informs Cory’s coach that Cory can no longer play, effectively shattering his son’s hopes. The significance of Friday in this context lies in its role as a day when personal and familial conflicts come to a head, forcing characters to confront their fears and desires.
The events of Friday also highlight Troy’s complex relationships with other characters. For instance, when Lyons, Troy’s eldest son from a previous marriage, visits to borrow money, it underscores the strained relationship between father and son. Lyons’ request for financial assistance on payday reveals his dependence on Troy, while also illustrating Troy’s conflicting emotions as a provider who resents yet supports his son’s musical aspirations. Moreover, Bono’s accusation of Troy’s infidelity, sparked by Troy buying a drink for another woman, further complicates his relationship with Rose, his wife. These interactions on Fridays expose the fragility of familial bonds and the underlying tensions that permeate their lives.
As the play progresses, Fridays continue to be pivotal. In Act One, Scene Four, which also occurs on a Friday, Troy celebrates his victory in becoming the first black garbage truck driver in the city. This achievement, while significant, is bittersweet as it comes amid ongoing familial discord. Cory’s anger towards Troy for sabotaging his football dreams resurfaces, leading to a confrontation that foreshadows deeper conflicts. Troy’s reflection on his past, his struggles, and his responsibilities as a father and husband all converge on this day, highlighting the duality of triumph and turmoil.
In the second act, the unraveling of Troy’s life is marked by significant events that also revolve around Fridays. Troy’s affair with Alberta and her subsequent pregnancy introduce a new layer of complexity to his relationships. When Alberta dies during childbirth, Troy is left to face the consequences of his actions. Rose’s decision to raise the baby, Raynell, while distancing herself emotionally from Troy, marks a turning point in their marriage. The culmination of these events on Fridays underscores the day’s role as a symbol of both routine and disruption, reflecting the ebb and flow of Troy’s life.
[5/24, 1:52 PM] Solution: *LITERATURE III*

*(NUMBER 7 VERSION 2)*

(7)
Friday is a pivotal day that highlights a number of important facets of the lives and relationships of the characters, signifying both everyday events and big moments. The play’s repeated mention of Friday highlights how cyclical their conflicts, goals, and problems are. Wilson creates a complicated narrative that emphasizes the significance of Fridays in forming the experiences of the characters and the overarching plot through a variety of Friday-related occurrences.
On a Friday in 1957, when the play starts, Troy and Bono—two close friends and garbage collectors—are getting paid. This day represents a little reprieve from their arduous work, enabling them to partake in their custom of drinking and conversing. Troy and Bono’s relationship is strengthened by the payday ritual, which also provides insight into their common challenges as working-class African American males. Troy confronts their manager, Mr. Rand, about racial prejudice at work, and their interaction demonstrates Troy’s bravery and tenacity. Friday is a day for introspection and resistance since Troy’s fight against systematic racism is reflected in his desire for equitable work chances.
Troy and his family’s conflict is exacerbated by Friday as well. Today, Cory, Troy’s son, talks about wanting to play college football, something Troy strongly disagrees with. Troy’s own encounters with racial prejudice in athletics are the reason behind his inability to endorse Cory’s goals. His doubts about Cory’s football career highlight the generational divide and divergent views on success and opportunity. When Troy tells Cory’s coach that he can no longer play, thereby dashing his son’s ambitions, the tension is increased even further.

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